Research involving Sing & See

The following articles describe some of the research involved in the development of Sing & See. Links to PDF files or conference websites are provided where these are available. Following these is a selection of research articles from other groups about visual feedback in singing and about using spectrographic analysis of voice.

Pat H. Wilson, Kerrie Lee, Jean Callaghan, C. William Thorpe (2008) Learning to sing in tune: Does real-time visual feedback help? journal of interdisciplinary music studies spring/fall 2008, volume 2, issue 1&2, art. #0821210, pp. 157-172
 
Wilson PH, Lee K, Callaghan J and Thorpe CW. (2007) Learning to sing in tune: Does real-time visual feedback help? In CIM07: 3rd Conference on Interdisciplinary Musicology, 15-19 August, Tallinn, Estonia.
 
Wilson PH. (2006) Does real-time visual feedback improve pitch accuracy in singing? Master of Applied Science Thesis, University of Sydney, 2 Nov 2006.
 
Wilson P, Thorpe W, Callaghan J. (2005) Looking at singing: does real-time visual feedback improve the way we learn to sing? In 2nd APSCOM Conference: Asia-Pacific Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music. 4-6 August, Seoul, South Korea.
 
Callaghan J, Thorpe W, van Doorn J (2004), ‘The science of singing and seeing’, in Parncutt R, Kessler A, and Zimmer F (Eds.) Proceedings of the Conference on Interdisciplinary Musicology (CIM04), 15-18 April 2004, Graz, Austria.
 
Callaghan J, Thorpe W, van Doorn J, and Wilson P (2003), ‘Sing and See’, in Yip LCR, Leung CC, & Lau WT (Eds) Curriculum Innovation in Music:75-80. Proceedings of the 4th Asia-Pacific Symposium on Music Education Research, 9-12 July 2003, Hong Kong.
 
Thorpe CW (2002), ‘Visual feedback of acoustic voice features in singing training’, in Proceedings of the 9th Australian Speech Science & Technology Conference, 3-5 December 2002, Melbourne, pp.349-354
 
Thorpe CW, Callaghan J, & van Doorn J (2002), ‘Visual feedback of acoustic voice features in singing training’, The 1st International Conference on Physiology and Acoustics of Singing, Groningen, The Netherlands October 3-5, 2002, www.med.rug.nl/pas/
 
Callaghan J, Thorpe W, and van Doorn J (2001), ‘Applications of Visual Feedback Technology in the Singing Studio’, Presented at the Australian Association of Research in Music Education Annual Conference, Newcastle, September 21-24, 2001.
 
Callaghan J, Thorpe W, and van Doorn J (1999), ‘Computer-assisted visual feedback in the teaching of singing’, in Barrett MS, McPherson GE, and Smith R, (Eds.) Children and Music: Developmental Perspectives, Proc. IMERS 1999;105-111, International Music Education Research Symposium, Launceston, February 4-7, 1999.
 
Thorpe, C. W., Callaghan, J. & van Doorn, J. (1999). Visual feedback of acoustic voice features: New tools for the teaching of singing, Australian Voice, 5, 32-39.
 
Van Doorn J, McLeod S, Baker E, Purcell A, Thorpe W, ‘Speech technology in clinical environments’, In Proc. ICSLP 1998;3,911-914, presented at the International Conference on Spoken Language Processing, Sydney, December 1-4, 1998.
 

Other research on visual feedback technology in singing teaching

This is a small selection of research on the use of visual feedback technology in singing teaching. Please contact us with any other reports that could be listed here.

Joscelyne-May C, Madill CJ, Thorpe W, McCabe P, 'The Effect of Clinician Feedback Type on the Acquisition of a Vocal Siren', Folia Phoniatr Logop 67:57-67, 2015.
 
Howard DM, Brereton J, Welch GF, Himonides E, Decosta M, Williams J, Howard AW, 'Are Real-Time Displays of Benefit in the Singing Studio? An Exploratory Study'.J Voice. 2006 Feb 9
 
Welch GF, Howard DM, Himonides E, Brereton J, 'Real-time feedback in the singing studio: an innovatory action-research project using new voice technology', Music Education Research 7(2):225-249, 2005.
 
Welch GF, Himonides E, Howard DM, Brereton J, 'VOXed: Technology as a meaningful teaching aid in the singing studio', in Parncutt R, Kessler A, and Zimmer F (Eds.) Proceedings of the Conference on Interdisciplinary Musicology (CIM04), 15-18 April 2004, Graz, Austria
 
Rossiter, D., Howard, D.M., & DeCosta, (1996). Voice development under training with and without the influence of real-time visually presented feedback. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 99(5), 3253-3256.
 
Nisbet, A. (1995). Spectrographic analysis of the singing voice applied to the teaching of singing. Australian Voice, 1: 65-68.
 
Miller, R. & Franco, J.C. (1991). Spectrographic analysis of the singing voice. The NATS Journal, 48(1): 4-5, 36.
 
Welch, G.F., Howard, D.M., & Rush, C. (1989) ‘Real-time visual feedback in the development of vocal pitch accuracy in singing’, Psychology of Music 17:146-157.

Other research on spectrographic analysis technology of singing voice

This is a small selection of research on the use of spectrographic analysis technology in singing. Please contact us with any other reports that could be listed here.

Callaghan J. and McDonald E. (2007) A comparative study of spoken and sung voice in performance. In CIM07: 3rd Conference on Interdisciplinary Musicology, 15-19 August, Tallinn, Estonia.
In this article, Drs Callaghan and McDonald use Sing & See to analyse the acoustic similarities and differences between the spoken voice and singing in performance situations, especially with regard to intonation and formant resonance.
Ford, J. K. (2003). Preference for strong or weak singer's formant resonance in choral tone quality. International Journal of Research in Choral Singing, 1 (1), 29-47.
This article presents a study on choral singing, analysing the preferences of listeners to choirs singing with or without resonance. They use Spectrographic analysis to measure the amount of resonance in the voices, and their conclusion seems to be that listeners prefer choirs singing with less resonance.